Association between neuronal autoantibodies and cognitive impairment in patients with lung cancer

JAMABartels F, Wandrey MM, Aigner A, et al. | July 02, 2021

Advertisement

Researchers conducted this prospective, cross-sectional study to evaluate the frequency of neuronal autoantibodies in patients with lung cancer and examine their association with cognitive function. Between June 2015 and April 2016, 167 patients (median age, 66.0 years [interquartile range, 59.0-72.0 years]; 105 men [62.9%]) with lung cancer (both SCLC and NSCLC) selected at a single lung cancer center in Berlin, Germany, were analyzed. Patients with SCLC who had any autoantibodies had an 11-fold higher risk of cognitive impairment than those who did not have any autoantibodies, and the increased risk was independent of age, gender, and neurological deficit. In this prospective, cross-sectional study, neuronal autoantibodies were found to be associated with cognitive impairment in more than one-third of lung cancer patients. These autoantibodies may represent a potentially treatable mechanism of immune-mediated cognitive impairment in lung cancer patients.

Read the full article on JAMA

Advertisement