Comparison of chief complaints and patient-reported symptoms of treatment- naive lung cancer patients before surgery

Patient Preference and AdherenceFeng Y, Dai W, Wang Y, et al. | May 26, 2021

Advertisement

Researchers intended to profile as well as compare chief complaints with patient-reported symptoms of lung cancer patients prior to surgery. They acquired data from a multicenter, prospective longitudinal analysis (CN-PRO-Lung 1) in China. Chief complaints were present in 195 (49.2%) patients. Coughing (38.1%), expectoration (25.5%), chest pain (13.6%), hemoptysis (10.6%), and shortness of breath (5.3%) were reported as the top 5 chief complaints. Significantly more patients had chief complaints of coughing and pain compared with those with the same symptoms rated ≥ 4 by MD Anderson Symptom Inventory‒Lung Cancer. Disturbed sleep (19.5%), distress (13.5%), dry mouth (13%), sadness (12%), and difficulty remembering (11.1%) were identified as the five most common moderate to severe patient-reported symptoms that were present in patients without chief complaints. Findings revealed that a patient-reported outcome tool could detect symptoms of lung cancer patients not incorporated in the chief complaint, indicating the need of performing the patient-reported outcome evaluation prior to lung cancer surgery for better patient care.

Read the full article on Patient Preference and Adherence

Advertisement