Health and economic impact at a population level of both primary and secondary preventive lung cancer interventions: A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis

Lung CancerDiaz M, Garcia M, Vidal C, et al. | July 21, 2021

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Researchers used a microsimulation model to examine the cost-effectiveness of smoking cessation strategies integrated with lung cancer screening in the European context at a population level from a societal viewpoint. They noted that a decrease in lung cancer incidence by 8%-46% was brought by smoking cessation interventions and such strategies were consistently more effective as well as cost-effective when initiating at younger ages. A decrease in lung cancer mortality by 1%-24% resulted from screening. Implementation of intensive smoking cessation interventions at ages 35, 40 and 45, plus screening every three years between the ages of 55 and 65, was suggested to be the most cost-effective strategy. Overall, a substantial reduction in lung cancer burden is achieved by combining smoking cessation interventions with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. This approach represents a very attractive prophylactic strategy. These integrated prophylactic strategies, particularly when offering various intensive interventions for smoking cessation at early ages, were not only found to be more cost-effective compared with both approaches separately but also permit for a more intensified LDCT without losing efficiency.

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