Risk of lung cancer among women in relation to lifetime history of tobacco smoking: A population-based case-control study in France (the WELCA study)

BMC CancerRusmaully J, Tvardik N, Martin D, et al. | June 18, 2021

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By conducting this population-based case-control study in the great Paris area, researchers explored the role of smoking patterns and cigarette dependence in female lung cancer, as well as analyzed variations based on histological subtype. This analysis involved women including 716 incident cases diagnosed between 2014 and 2017 as well as 757 age-matched controls. For each participant, the comprehensive smoking index (CSI), a score modelling the integrated impacts of intensity, duration and time since quitting smoking was ascertained. The risk of lung cancer was shown to increase linearly with intensity and span of tobacco smoking while it was revealed to decline with time since quitting, to reach the risk in never-smokers following 20 years of abstinence. The odds ratio in the highest vs the lowest quartile of CSI was estimated to be 12.64. Small cell or squamous cell carcinomas risk rose with the CSI more sharply compared with the risk of adenocarcinomas. Factors that behaved as independent risk factors were: deep smoke inhalation, dark vs blond tobacco, conventional vs light cigarettes, and unfiltered vs filtered cigarettes, as well as having mixed smoking habits. Overall, these observations add to the current understanding of the impacts of tobacco smoking patterns on lung cancer risk in women.

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