Menopause is associated with immune activation in women with HIV

The Journal of Infectious DiseasesPeters BA, Xue X, Sheira LA, et al. | June 28, 2021

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Since persistent immune activation due to gut barrier dysfunction is a suspected cause of morbidity in HIV, but the impact of menopause on this pathway is unexplored, experts aspired to explore whether menopause is correlated with immune activation in women with HIV. Among 350 women with HIV from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study, plasma biomarkers of gut barrier dysfunction (intestinal fatty acid binding protein), innate immune activation (soluble CD14 and CD163; sCD14, sCD163), and systemic inflammation (interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1; IL-6, TNFR1), have been measured at 674 person-visits spanning ≤ 2 years. Menopause may increase innate immune activation in HIV-positive women, but there is no evidence that it has an effect on the gut barrier or inflammation. Further research into the clinical implications of immune activation during the menopausal transition is needed.

Read the full article on The Journal of Infectious Diseases

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