Association between race and COVID-19 outcomes among 2.6 million children in England

JAMASaatci D, Ranger TA, Garriga C, et al. | June 23, 2021

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Researchers intended to determine if there is an association between race and childhood COVID-19 testing and hospital outcomes. Between January 24 and November 30, 2020, children (0-18 years of age) from participating family practices in England were identified in the QResearch database. The primary outcome was hospital admission with confirmed COVID-19, whereas secondary outcomes were SARS-CoV-2–positive test result and any hospital attendance with confirmed COVID-19 and intensive care admission. Of the 2,576,353 children (mean [SD] age, 9.23 [5.24] years; 48.8% female), 410,726 (15.9%) were tested for SARS-CoV-2, with 26,322 (6.4%) testing positive. Several race-specific disparities in severe COVID-19 outcomes were observed in this large population-based study that investigated the relationship between race and childhood COVID-19 testing and hospital outcomes. However, before drawing any further conclusions from this cohort study, ascertainment bias and residual confounding should be considered. Overall, the findings of this study have significant public health implications on a global scale.

Read the full article on JAMA

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